Landing brake

I decided to work on something different for a couple of days. I think I had an urge to have something that moves so decided to do some work on the landing brake. The landing brake on my long-ez was already built and it was done very well. The fit is probably as close as you can get it. When I purchased my long-ez it came with an actuator kit that had the actuator, wiring and plans. I am not sure who’s kit it was but I followed the directions on installation.

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I maneuvered the fuselage into a more ergonomic position for doing the layups.

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My fuselage was already set up for the mechanical system. I decided to remove the support, however, everything that was already done is shifted slightly to the right. I don’t think its a big deal as the kit is intended as a mod to existing aircraft.

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I used a die grinder to grind through the glass that was holding the support in place.

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After a couple light taps with a hammer and it was free.

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I sanded off all the remaining glass and prepped the area for glassing. I retracted the actuator fully closed and did a test fit to find out where the support pad was going and laid out its location.

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I marked out the size of glass I would require and wet the layers out between some bagging film.

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I wanted to reinforce the seat back to the floor. The directions also said to sandwich the 18 lb foam between four layers of glass so I used continuous layers of glass to do both. I also used flox in the joint between the seat back and the floor to create more of a radius.

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I cut and shaped the 18 lb core to a 5″ x 6″ pad.

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I used some of the left over flox around the core.

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I put on the remainder glass over the core, applied peel ply and worked out any remaining air.

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After the layup had cured I drilled the four 0.25 holes for the mounting bolts through the seat back.

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I installed the actuator and temporarily wired it to my 12 volt power supply. I tested the movement and fine tuned the length of the actuator to get it to pull the brake up snug.

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The plans call for 60 degrees when the brake is deployed. I think I can live with this 🙂

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The directions call for a backing plate on the front side of the pilots seat. I think its a little overkill since most load will be in compression. However, I know it will make the attach area stronger so in it goes. I did a rubbing of the exit of the holes on the front side of the pilot seat and center punched their location onto some 0.125 thick aluminum.

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I cut the rectangle out of the aluminum plate, drilled the holes to full size and beveled the edges. It kinda looks like a light switch cover 🙂

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I test fit the plate to make sure I got my holes in the correct location.

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All the aluminum bits were etched and alodined.

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I scuffed all the mating surfaces for the aluminum parts as I will be bonding them on. I will use structural adhesive again just as I did on my elevators.

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I applied the adhesive to both sides that are going to be bonded. I was a little heavy on my applications of the adhesive but the excess will squeeze out. It is better to have too much and have it squeeze out then have too little.

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Here you can see the excess adhesive working itself out. I wait a little bit then clean off all the excess adhesive.

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The mounting brackets on the brake door are installed in the same manor.

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All the excess adhesive is cleaned up. I will be replacing the hardware on the door to use dimple washers and countersunk screws. You can also see how the brackets are shifted to one side.

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And here is the actuator reinstalled. I will leave the brake off until I change the hardware then final install it.

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the Garaggio

Projects from Joe's Workshop

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